Lately, I’ve published reviews about Elementor, Divi, Thrive Architect and Oxygen, which are all really extensive page builders for WordPress.  And they’re not the only ones, there’s also Beaver Builder, SiteOrigin and WP Bakery (formely known as Visual Composer) to name a few well known page builders. 

You would think that market is pretty saturated by now, but the team behind Brizy still seem to believe they can conquer a spot in that market as well. And given the fact that Brizy has an impressive 30.000 active installs on WordPress.org just 5 months after their initial launch, they just might be right…

Really extensive free version

Brizy interface

Those are impressive numbers, and the really extensive free version of Brizy might have had something to do with that. and when I say really extensive, I do mean really extensive…

Think Elementor, but then including a bunch of features that are only in Elementor Pro. For example, the free version of Brizy offers a simple but effective contact form, a countdown module, multiple WooCommerce widgets and you can save every “block” as a global module, or turn it into a slider.

The latter requires a little more explanation. The structure of a Brizy page is build up with blocks. Blocks are comparable with sections in Divi and Elementor. In such a block you drag one or more “design elements” (other page builders call these modules or widgets).

A design element is for example a text block, icon, image, video, button, Google Map, counter, tabs, accordion or form. At the time of writing there are about 20 of these design elements; that is a bit thin but keep in mind that Brizy just launched a few months ago so there will more elements in a while.

Pre-made blocks

For that reason, some modules that you might expect from other page builders are missing in Brizy for now, such as testimonials, price tables and social media buttons.
However, there are quite a few pre-made blocks available – professionally designed blocks that already contain a number of design elements that you can add to your page.
At the time of writing there are about 150 of those blocks, and you can choose between 7 different price table templates, 9 testimonial templates and so on. Of course, you can easily adjust these templates to your own situation.

Like most page builders, Brizy also let’s you save your own blocks in a library so you can easily reuse them on other pages. At the moment you can only store complete blocks, so no individual design elements such as a button or contact form.

Styling and other options

The way you set the styling and other options is one of the things Brizy does different from other page builders. In most page builders, those options appear in the sidebar when you click on a module, but Brizy shows a subtle toolbar near the module itself, that only displays the elements that you need at that moment. They call that “smart & clutter free”.

The Brizy way does take a little getting used to, because you have to do all your adjustments in fairly small popup windows and you have to learn what the different icons do. Those icons are pretty clear though, so you’ll get used to them pretty fast. You can adjust things like colors, fonts, borders (with border radius), shadows and animations. 

Brizy also features an advanced global styling feature. As you can see in the image above, you have a color palet with 8 standard colors below the color picker. Other page builders have that too, but with Brizy, these colors are saved as “linked color”. If you adjust one of those “linked colors”, that color will change anywhere you’ve used it: in a header, regular text, on a button, a background, an overlay… and not just on the current page, but on your entire website. Really handy! The same goes for the font (Google Fonts), the size of the h1 till h5 tags, paragraphs, and you can also save your own profile.

Really user friendly and flexible

Those kind of things make Brizy really user friendly and flexible. You can adjust your text inline – just click and type – and you can also change the size of an image by dragging it to the size you want. The same goes for other design elements as well, like borders, spacers and counters, and the width of a column or padding of a block; just click on it and drag it to the size you need it to be. 

Of course, you can also drag all design elements to wherever you want them, and ordening blocks and columns works the same way too. Further on, you can add almost anything to modules like sliders, tabs and accordeons; not just text or images, but also videos, icons, buttons, contact forms, Google Maps and any other module. 

Last but not least, al your adjustments are saved automatically, so there’s always a recent backup if something goes wrong.

Brizy Pro

The free version of Brizy contains some interesting modules that are only available in the paid version with other page builders, like contact forms and even a header and footer builder.
But of course, the people at Brizy have to make money too, so they also have a Pro version. 

Even though the free version offers a lot of modules already, the Brizy team still saved a few for Brizy Pro. In pro, you’ll find a photo gallery module, a carousel module and a post module. These modules are fairly standard, but still offer some cool options; for example, you can drag the height of an image in the photo gallery module so you can create your own masonry grid, and in the carousel module, you can add any module you want – same as in tabs, sliders and accordeons. The post module let’s you create your own blog layout. 

The post module uses Dynamic Content, another really important feature that’s only available in Brizy Pro. With dynamic content, you can for example display the featured image, post title, post content, author and publication date wherever you want. That’s a must-have feature for a custom blog archive, but you could also use it to add a featured image as a header image or the title in a page template. 

In addition to the standard WordPress fields, you can also add fields from custom post types as dynamic content. That way, you could design a custom product page in WooCommerce, and you decide where you put elements like the price, product images, description, reviews etcetera. Brizy also supports Toolset, ACF and Pods.

Next to that, there are some enhanced options available in Brizy Pro, like shape dividers, image and video filters and integration for Mailchimp and other e-mail providers in the contact form. 

The last really cool feature of Brizy Pro I want to address is their popup builder. Next to the standard URL, you can also add a popup window to a link or button. In that popup window, you can add any module you want. At the moment, the popup can only be activated by clicking on a link or button, but soon it will also be possible to set other triggers so you can show the popup when a visitor has been on your site for a set amount of time (like 10 seconds), or when he moves to click the page away.

Coming soon…

Those automated popup triggers are certainly not the only thing that will be added soon. The roadmap contains a portfolio module, mega menu module, conditional logic for blocks, an A/B testing feature and Unsplash integration, that gives you instant access to hunderds of thousands free images from right within the Brizy builder. There will also be a good amount of premium page designs in pro, and we can expect those to be high quality since the team behind Brizy has been a succesfull author on ThemeForest for years already.

Brizy Pro price

Brizy Pro isn’t the cheapest premium page builder; at the moment they only offer a lifetime licence for an unlimited amount of websites, that costs $ 299,00. 

However, that lifetime licence won’t be available for much longer. Brizy will move to a yearly recurring pricing model, where you pay a yearly fee based on the amount of websites you want to use Brizy Pro on and the features you want to use.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for a good page builder, I would certainly consider Brizy. Their team looked really well at other page builder like Elementor, Divi and Thrive, and integrated the best elements from those builders into their own plugin. Even the free version of Brizy can measure itself with paid page builders – just like Elementor can.

I used to advise Elementor every time someone was wanted a good free page builder with lots of possibilities, but now I would advise you to give Brizy a try as well before you choose.

If the pro version is worth it’s price? Well, that depends… my first impression was “pfew, that pretty expensive for such a new page builder”. Certainly if you know a Divi lifetime licence is “only” $ 249,00. But for web builders like myself, a lifetime deal for an unlimited amount of websites is always a really interesting deal, and I have trust in Brizy’s future so I bought a licence anyway.

However, if you just have one site, I’d probably wait a little for their new pricing model. I don’t know how much it’s going to cost, but Elementor is at $ 49,00 a year for 1 site so I expect Brizy to be around that same price point.

Need help with Brizy or another page builder?

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